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robert reilly

I'm a retired journalist who began my career as a summer copyboy before my senior year in high school for CBS News Washington under then Vice President Theodore Koop. The summer following my high school graduation I served as a disc jockey for radio station WTCR in Asland, Kentucky that was then owned by Town and Country Network founded by Connie B. Gay. I then joined the Army and served as a military correspondent in Korea and Ft. Belvoir, Virginia. I earned a BS degree from Arizona State University and a MA degree from the University of Iowa. I also studied at the Wharton School, the Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy (NIH Summer Fellow), Oxford University, the University of London, Wesleyan University and ASU"s graduate program in higher education. I served as my own attorney in federal court in an age discrimination case (Dist. of Arizona case No. 96-0063) taking it up to trial in 18 months. My news articles have appeared in several publications nationwide. I've written a self-published novel titled "The Return of John Marshall" that's available from Amazon.com, Borders, Barnes& Noble, Google and 25,000 book retailers nationwide. One reviewer wrote: "Above all, this is a novel of ideas, sometimes called a protest or propaganda novel--for example, Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath, Paton's Cry, the Beloved Country, and Upton Sinclair's The Jungle. The ingredients in this manuscript are handled superbly"... I'm working on a second novel.

Making Money Off Of Dead People

Wall Street has a new gimmick. Buy a life insurance policy below face value and hope the policy holder dies sooner rather than later. "The sooner the policy holder dies, the bigger the return," says The New York Times. Will that sentenced be prominently placed in the promotional material? I doubt it.

Those Poor Law Students

The New York Times reports that many graduates of the nation's top law schools are having a tough time finding jobs. The chickens are coming home to roost. Law, like the automobile and other businesses, need to change its ways to adjust to the 21st century.