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Big Think Needs a VP of Content! Is That You?

Big Think is a knowledge forum that features insights from the world’s leading thinkers. Whether it’s Michio Kaku discussing energy sources of the future or Stephen Dubner, the co-author of Freakonomics and Think Like a Freak, explaining the hidden business lessons in a hot dog eating contest, or Sheila Heen on the art and science of giving and receiving feedback, we bring you the ideas you need to thrive in the knowledge economy.


We are looking for an energetic, creative new team member who loves using the latest tech products to build audience engagement. The ideal candidate for Big Think’s VP of Content is someone who can manage the site’s information architecture, drive our SEO, and spot opportunities to package our content in ways that give our readers what they want when they need it. This person must have years of experience analyzing web analytics in order to produce engaging content and seize opportunities to innovate. He or she will develop content strategies for BigThink.com as well as our subscription services Big Think Edge and Big Think Mentor.

For more information and to apply visit MediaBistro.com.


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