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Politics & Current Affairs

Michael Bloomberg Action Plan

Michael Bloomberg is the founder of the financial media company Bloomberg LLC and was elected the mayor of New York City in 2001. In his plan of action for the next president's first 100 days, Bloomberg advises against a "legislative run," and encourages action on all fronts—from immigration to education to energy. The economy, and renewed confidence in it, must be at the top of the agenda. In the long term, Bloomberg wants to see a system that takes advantage of bipartisan relationships and respects the intelligence of the American people.

1. Expand, improve and invest in national infrastructure. Raise revenue through tolls, taxes, fees, and discuss a role for privatization as well. And work with Congress to reform earmark spending on infrastructure.


2. Legislate the creation of an infrastructure bank that funds projects based strictly on merit. Agree to invest more money in the projects that the country needs most. States and cities must be held accountable for building on time and on budget.

3. Diversify and develop new types of energy production, including nuclear, offshore oil and particularly green power. Develop higher energy-efficiency standards. Raise revenue through a carbon tax or a cap-and-trade system and by eliminating tax cuts for oil companies.

4. Reform immigration. Impose tight border security, create an effective worker identification card for all immigrants, and provide those who are here illegally the chance to earn the right to stay.

5. America needs a complete overhaul of its education system. This will include higher standards, higher salaries, merit pay, tenure reform, school report cards, and a longer school day.

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6. Reinstate the estate tax.

7. Appoint a bipartisan cabinet and let both sides enjoy a sense of victory in legislative negotiations.

Source: http://www.newsweek.com/id/165642


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